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Skin Facts

Wear a glow that no amount of salt can produce.


Did you know?
  • We lose 1% of collagen per year after the age of 29.
  • Collagen is broken down daily by the sun and free-radical damage.
  • Young skin sheds cells about every 30 days and older skin sheds every 60 days.
  • Moisturizers attract water molecules plumping up dehydrated skin and making wrinkles less noticeable.
  • The needs of your skin, including hydration and moisturizing, will change from time to time and as you age.
  • Skincare products and cosmetics don’t last forever. Check expiration dates and keep out of sunlight.
  • Despite popular belief, dry skin does not cause wrinkles, though it can make all lines and wrinkles appear worse.
  • Moisturizers are only a temporary fix. Gravity, aging, and sun exposure will do their damage anyway.
  • Exfoliating with pits and crushed seeds is not the answer. If the substance is too rough it will create micro-tears in your skin.
  • How you sleep affects your age. Sleeping on your back is the best way to minimize wrinkling on your face and neck.
  • New research suggests that we accumulate 10% of sun damage with each passing decade.
  • The sun does penetrate window glass, so keep sunscreen handy all year round. Make reapplying your sunscreen a ritual.
  • Taking two aspirin immediately after sun exposure will help prevent a sunburn from developing.
  • Acne plagues the average sufferer for seven years and adult women often for 20 years or more.
  • Approximately 40% of people from the age of 20 to 60 suffer from adult blemishes, breakouts, and acne.
  • A pimple is weeks in the making; the pimple you see today cannot be a direct result of the chocolate you ate yesterday.
  • If you have facial redness, rosacea, or broken capillaries, saunas, steam baths, coffee, wind, and alcohol will only irritate the skin further.

Age Spots and Sun Damage

The visible signs of aging cannot be fully avoided, but can be dramatically minimized. The key is to do it as gently as possible. As far as the skin is concerned, there are two types of aging — intrinsic and extrinsic. Intrinsic aging involves the inevitable; as we grow older, our skin naturally becomes thinner and drier. Diminished amounts of collagen make the skin less elastic. What used to bounce back begins to sag. Static, deep wrinkles may begin appearing. The rate of these events is genetically determined for each person; the process first becomes noticeable between the ages of 30 and 35.


Extrinsic aging results from exposure to the environment. Extrinsic aging is the critical element in determining who looks older or younger than their biological age. Exposure to sunlight is a key contributor to extrinsic aging. Photoaging occurs when elastin and a collagen breakdown are not replaced, causing fine lines and wrinkles to intensify. Photoaging also causes pigment changes with development of age spots (sun-induced freckles) and uneven skin tone. Spider veins and dilated capillaries are another sign of photoaged skin.


Lifestyle choices also have an impact on extrinsic aging. Cigarette smoking contributes to the breakdown of elastin and collagen and impairs the body's healing capacity.


The simplest way to see the contrast between intrinsic and extrinsic aging is to compare skin commonly exposed to the sun (face, hands, and neck) and skin not exposed to the sun (usually on the breasts, inner arms or buttocks).


Fine Lines and Wrinkles

Middle and old age aren't what they used to be, thank goodness. With many baby boomers just hitting their stride, and lots of grandparents embarking on dynamic new adventures, there's no reason why the way we look on the outside can't reflect the vitality we feel on the inside.


This means addressing fine lines and wrinkles, the most common sign of aging skin. Some people are genetically predisposed to wrinkling. Sun exposure and smoking are the biggest environmental culprits, though stress can also be a factor.


There are many cosmetic antidotes that claim to improve the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles — drugstores have shelves of them on display. Now that medical technology in this field is gaining more attention, consumers have started giving up on "lotions and potions," seeking scientifically proven methods of bringing out the beauty within.


Fine lines and wrinkles are signs of intrinsic or chronological aging; there's no way to entirely avoid them. As we grow older, our skin becomes thinner and drier. Weakened collagen makes the skin less elastic. Static wrinkles begin to appear. The rate of intrinsic aging occurs at a variable, genetically determined rate; the process is often first noticeable between the ages of 30 and 35.


We do have control over extrinsic aging, a result of exposure to the environment. Extrinsic aging is the critical element in determining who looks older or younger than their biological age. Over-exposure to sunlight is responsible for the majority of problems associated with extrinsic aging. Sun-damaged skin is photoaged from a decrease in collagen and other dermal proteins. This gradual process results in the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. Over time, these can progress into deep wrinkles and furrows. Photoaging also causes pigmentary changes; "age spots" (sun-induced freckles), uneven skin tone, spider veins and dilated capillaries.


The simplest way to see the contrast between intrinsic and extrinsic aging is to compare skin commonly exposed to the sun (face, hands, neck) and skin not exposed to the sun (usually on the breasts, inner arms, or buttocks).


There are a number of options for the treatment of fine lines and wrinkles, each with varied expense, recovery time, and results. The following are the most common conventional treatments used today:


Facial Capillaries Rosacea and Facial Redness

The face has an extensive network of veins and small blood vessels called capillaries. Aging, trauma, sun exposure, and other factors can cause these vessels to become more prominent or to break. The breaks, also called telangiectasias, commonly appear as spider veins or as red streaks or blotches. Sometimes broken capillaries can cause a diffused redness in the skin, called erythema, a source of social embarrassment for many people. Rosacea is a common skin condition that is characterized by diffused erythema


Unwanted hair

Unwanted hair is a problem shared by both men and women. In many cases the condition runs in families. Race can also be a factor — whites are more prone to having excess facial hair than are Asians and blacks. Some people experience unwanted or excess hair from the time they reach puberty; others find it to be a condition that gets worse with age. Some women experience additional hair growth during pregnancy or menopause. Women who experience sudden hair growth should consult with their physicians, as this may be a sign of other medical conditions.


Hair does not come in any one size or type. Follicles in different parts of the body produce differing types of hair. Hair can grow in thick, bushy patches or in long thin strands. In addition, hair is produced in follicles that can be found at different depths and densities — as close to the skin's surface as a millimeter or as deep as five millimeters or more. Until recently, this great variety in hair types and body locations made long-lasting hair removal a significant challenge.


Acne

Acne is one of the misfortunes of adolescence. For some people, skin blemishes occur in adult life as well. While not life threatening, acne can leave life-long emotional and physical scars — a reminder of the embarrassment and self-consciousness that came with the pimples. No one wants to get zits.


Approximately 90% of all adolescents and 25% of all adults experience acne at some point in their lives. It's one of the most extensive medical conditions in the world, and is responsible for about 30% of all visits to the dermatologists. Unfortunately, it's not easy to treat. Traditional therapies have a variety of side effects and sometimes require months to work, if they work at all. Topical creams and lotions can cause redness and irritation. Oral antibiotics can cause stomach upset, light sensitivity, and yeast infections in women, and studies indicate about 40% of skin bacteria have become resistant to antibiotics, making them a doubtful ally in the fight against skin breakouts.


Acne is a common, chronic skin condition caused by inflammation of oil-producing sebaceous glands. Acne usually begins between the ages of 10 and 13, and persists for five to 10 years. Acne breakouts are most common on the face, but they can also occur on the back, shoulders, neck, chest, scalp, upper arms, and legs.


Young men and women get acne in equal numbers. Younger males are more prone to severe, longer-lasting forms of the skin condition. Many women suffer from "hormonal acne" — their outbreaks are tied to the hormonal changes related to their menstrual cycle. While hormonal acne typically starts between the ages of 20-25, it can strike teenagers as well. Hormonal acne is sometimes persistent in women into their 30s.


In adolescents, acne breakouts are related to the natural release of androgen hormones, which occur during puberty. Acne can also be caused by the use of harmful, body-building steroid drugs. Humidity and perspiration can also contribute to breakouts. Contrary to earlier belief, acne is not affected by diet or poor hygiene. In fact, over-washing can make an acne flare-up harder to control.


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SKIN CARE:

Skincare products and cosmetics don’t last forever. Check expiration dates and keep out of sunlight.

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FACT:

Despite popular belief, dry skin does not cause wrinkles, though it can make all lines and wrinkles appear worse.

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PRODUCT RECOMMENDATION:

Tri-Luma Cream is the only triple-action cream approved for the short-term and intermittent long-term treatment of moderate to severe melasma. The special combination of three active ingredients is more effective than any combination of the individual components.

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